June 2014 - Ventura County Medical Center and rggroup featured in "Construction Today"

Comment

June 2014 - Ventura County Medical Center and rggroup featured in "Construction Today"

Article by Jim Harris:

Excerpt:

The Ventura County Medical Center’s use of a design/build contract for the construction of a replacement wing to its existing hospital in Ventura, Calif., will allow the facility to be built in the most efficient and cost-effective way possible. 

“Typically in healthcare, there’s a gap between the development of the designs and drawings and the actual construction, which leads to hospitals being completed at an additional cost to close that gap,” says Rebekah Gladson, president of RG Group Global, the program/construction manager representing the medical center on the $300 million project. “The design/build approach allows the owner to achieve the highest value for what they’re building, and offers the lowest cost growth and shortest overall schedule. We have a completely integrated team, which allow us to have a very high-performing and lean process.”

Download full Article in PDF

Comment

March 2010 - UC Irvine News: Blazing a trail for 21st century medicine

Comment

March 2010 - UC Irvine News: Blazing a trail for 21st century medicine

Excerpt:

The new medical education facility was designed with future of healthcare - and the planet - in mind.

Modern medicine in the U.S. is being transformed by technological advances and changing demographics, and at UC Irvine, the training of future doctors is being transformed as well.

A model for future sustainable development on campus, the structure is one of UCI’s greenest. Operable windows allow natural ventilation, and “solar chimneys” — rather than fans or electricity — move air through the building. It was designed to draw in outdoor light, reducing reliance on artificial illumination, while window shading is provided to block excessive heat.

Thanks to such elements, the structure’s energy performance is 27.4 percent better than that required by the California State Energy Code, the most stringent in the nation. UCI officials are seeking Gold certification for the project through the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design system.

“The design features in the medical education building are a measure of the increasing movement toward greater energy efficiency and environmental responsibility in new construction,” saysRebekah Gladson, associate vice chancellor and campus architect. “This is a significant step for campus sustainability.”

Comment

July 2011 - UC Irvine News: Blueprint for hope

Comment

July 2011 - UC Irvine News: Blueprint for hope

Excerpt:

Rebekah Gladson draws on her experience as UCI campus architect to build an orphanage in India. For her, the comparatively small project has offered big challenges — and even greater rewards by sheltering and educating street children.

Compared to the hospitals, research labs, university buildings and other important structures Rebekah Gladson has designed as campus architect and associate vice chancellor of UC Irvine, an orphanage in India might seem like a small, insignificant project. Not to her.

For Gladson, whose visionary buildings have earned her the Design-Build Institute of America’s Brunelleschi Lifetime Achievement Award and election to The American Institute of ArchitectsCollege of Fellows, the orphanage has become one of the most meaningful projects she’s undertaken in her 25-year career.

Comment

December 2011 - UC Irvine News: UCI’s Engineering Hall wins construction award

Comment

December 2011 - UC Irvine News: UCI’s Engineering Hall wins construction award

Excerpt:

The team behind construction of UC Irvine’s Engineering Hall has won the esteemed 2011 Design-Build Institute of America award for design excellence in educational facilities, which honors projects in which all services are provided under one contract with a single point of responsibility.

“This was truly a team effort,” said campus architect Rebekah Gladson, associate vice chancellor for design & construction services. “UCI took the lead in the strategic vision and architectural utilization of the plan from inception to completion. The design-build concept brought huge savings in both cost and energy usage.”

Engineering Hall, in combination with the campus’s energy efficient infrastructure, outperforms California’s energy code standards by 55 percent.

“DBIA doesn’t give this award for projects that just meet expectations,” she added. “They have to exceed expectations in every way.”

 

Comment

January 2009 - UC Irvine News: New Era in Healthcare

Comment

January 2009 - UC Irvine News: New Era in Healthcare

Excerpt:

University Hospital has set new standards for cost-efficient design and construction. The seven-story, $555.9-million hospital was completed on budget and four months ahead of schedule – a full two years faster than other California hospitals. The 482,428-square-foot building replaces the existing main hospital built in 1960.

Hospitals are among the most complicated structures to design and build. They must accommodate constantly changing medical technology, ensure an infection and pathogen-free environment and incorporate seismic codes that enable them to remain standing after a 9.0 magnitude earthquake.

Medical center leadership also worked closely with state regulators.

“Building a hospital is a collaboration between the hospital, designers and regulatory entities,” said Dr. David Carlisle, head of the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development. “We intend to use this positive experience to improve the efficiency of other hospital projects statewide.”

“With a knowledgeable team, UC Irvine worked proactively with OSHPD and managed their project efficiently,” he said.

Chancellor Michael Drake, M.D., said the effort, led by Wendell Brase, administrative and business affairs vice chancellor, and Rebekah Gladson, campus architect, advanced at a record pace even as other university building projects demanded their time and energy.

“Completing construction early on a complex development like an academic medical center is a remarkable achievement,” Drake said.

 

Comment

November 2006 - DBIA:  Rebekah G. Gladson receives the Brunelleschi Lifetime Achievement Awards

Comment

November 2006 - DBIA: Rebekah G. Gladson receives the Brunelleschi Lifetime Achievement Awards

Excerpt:

Rebekah Gladson has championed design-build project delivery at the University of California (UCI), Irvine. Her vision and leadership have transformed the campus, both in terms of the built environment and in the use of design-build.

A hands-on master builder, her sense of design and knowledge of construction helps each design-build team deliver quality projects on time and within budget and in a working environment of respect between owner, contractor, architect, and engineer.

UCI’s Dean of the School of Medicine, Dr. Thomas Cesario said, “Rebekah has put her heart and soul into our buildings. She works with the faculty to see that their wishes and needs are fulfilled to the greatest extent possible, while creating architecturally elegant buildings that are also built to the highest standards.”

Truly a unique figure in the design-build industry, Rebekah’s passion for excellence in every step of the design-build process is inspirational.

Comment

February 2013 - Ventura County Star: $305 million hospital proposal goes to county supervisors on Tuesday - Ventura County Star

Comment

February 2013 - Ventura County Star: $305 million hospital proposal goes to county supervisors on Tuesday - Ventura County Star

Excerpt:

A $305 million construction project that will replace half of Ventura County Medical Center’s main hospital is set to start this summer, with completion expected in spring 2017.

It’s the biggest investment that county officials can recall.

“This is the crescendo,” Dr. Robert Gonzalez, director of the Ventura County Health Care Agency, said last week.

Project manager Rebekah Gladson said the new structure will have the same functions as the one it’s replacing, but that the space had to be larger to meet modern building codes. It will be a concrete-and-steel structure that has been designed to be functional if a major earthquake strikes Ventura, she said.

The operating rooms will be twice as large as the current ones, providing space for doctors to perform diagnostic tests while doing surgery on victims of major accidents, Gonzalez said.

Officials said the wing of 232,000 square feet will offer private rooms, providing comfort for patients and infection control. Patients who are deteriorating can often stay where they are because sophisticated equipment can be brought to them, Gonzalez said.

Doctors were part of a team that evaluated proposals for cost and function, said Dr. John Fankhauser, medical director of the hospital. The winning proposal was submitted by Clark Construction Group, which is headquartered in Bethesda, Md.

By Kathleen Wilson

Saturday, February 2, 2013

 

This story originally appeared on vcstar.com.

Comment